Mom's adjika recipe

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This Adjika is not difficult to make, considering that all the ingredients are simply placed in a food processor and you don't have to sow the jalapeƱos - SCORE!

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Pesto is for Italians as Adjika is for Slavs. What is adjika?adzhika in English)? It is like a semi-spicy sauce, similar to Italian red pesto. It is used to flavor food. I like to spread it on the pork. I recently discovered that the adjika is amazing with fajitas and tacos!

This is a canning recipe. This makes 7 jars (1 pint) of adjika. That is, 14 cups. It's not difficult to do, considering that all ingredients are simply placed in a food processor and you don't have to seed the jalapeƱos – SCORE!

Ingredients for Mom's Adjika version:

1 pound (about 2 large) Carrots, peeled and cut into 1 ā€³ pieces 1 pound (about 5 medium) Apples, peeled and cored 1 pound (3-4 large) Peppers – red or yellow, chopped into 1 ā€³ pieces 5 pounds (about 10 cups) ripe tomatoes, quartered 1 cup oil (olive, canola, or vegetable oil) 150 grams (2/3 cup or about 24) large garlic cloves 150 grams (2/3 cup or about 14 medium) jalapeƱos, stemless (if like your spicy odjika, use a few more jalapeƱos) 2 tablespoons salt

Homemade canning tools:

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How to do mom's adjika:

1. Using a food processor: Chop the carrots and place them in a large saucepan.

Chop apples and add them to the pot

Chop the peppers and add them to the pot

Chop the tomatoes and add them to the pot.

2. Bring the pot to a boil over high heat, stir and return to a boil and repeat several more times until the mixture is hot and constantly boils when stirred. The mixture is very thick, so a little stirring is needed to heat it up.

3. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 1 1/2 hours. Stir occasionally.

4. Chop the garlic and jalapeƱos together in the food processor.

This Adjika is not difficult to make, considering that all the ingredients are simply placed in a food processor and you don't have to sow the jalapeƱos - SCORE!

5. Add oil, salt, garlic, and jalapeƱos to the pot and continue to simmer for another 30 minutes.

This Adjika is not difficult to make, considering that all the ingredients are simply placed in a food processor and you don't have to sow the jalapeƱos - SCORE!

6. Prepare the cans (see canning process).

Canning process:

1. To sterilize your clean jars: wash them and let them dry in the oven at 215ĀŗC for about 20 minutes or until they are completely dry. Boil the tops 5 min.

2. Transfer your boiling hot adjika to the jars with a glass measuring cup and funnel (least messy method) leaving approximately 1/4 "of space.

3. Screw the caps on tight enough to keep a tight seal in place, but do not over-tighten them as air bubbles must be able to escape.

4. Place the packed cans in the canning pot and cover with 1-2 inches of water. Bring to a boil and process 15 minutes. Remove from the pot with the jar and leave at room temperature without discomfort for 12-24 hours. You may hear a pop when the jars are completely sealed. After 24 hours, verify that the seal has been formed by pressing down on the center of the cap; it should not move at all. If the seal does not form, refrigerate the adjika and enjoy within 3 months.

Current canning guidelines:

We updated this recipe in 2019 to match the latest canning guidelines that recommend processing in water rather than in the oven. It is an excellent resource for answering frequently asked questions about canning.

Mom's adjika recipe: the Russians pesto! (ŠŠ“Š¶ŠøŠŗŠ°)

Preparation time: 1 hour

Cooking time: 2 hours.

Total time: 3 hours

Skill level: medium

Manufacturing cost: $ 20

Servings: 14 cups

  • 1 pound of about 2 large carrots, peeled and cut into 1 "pieces
  • 1 lb approximately 5 medium apples, peeled and cored
  • 1 pound 3-4 large bell peppers – chopped into 1 "pieces
  • 5 pounds about 10 cups ripe tomatoes, quartered
  • 1 cup olive, canola, or vegetable oil
  • 150 grams 2/3 cup or about 24 large garlic cloves
  • 150 grams 2/3 cup or about 14 medium jalapeƱos, stemless
  • 2 tablespoons of salt
  1. Using a food processor, chop carrots, apples, bell peppers, tomatoes, and put them in a large saucepan.

  2. Bring the pot to a boil over high heat, stir and return to a boil, and repeat several more times until the mixture is hot and constantly boils when stirred. The mixture is very thick, so a little stirring is needed to heat it up.

  3. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 1 1/2 hours. Stir occasionally.

  4. Chop the garlic and jalapeƱos together in the food processor.

  5. Add oil, salt, garlic, and jalapeƱos to the pot and continue to simmer for another 30 minutes.

  6. Prepare the cans.

To sterilize your clean jars: Wash them and let them dry in the oven at 215ĀŗC for about 20 minutes or until they are completely dry. Boil the tops 5 min.

  1. Transfer your hot boiling adjika to the jars with a glass measuring cup and funnel (least messy method) leaving approximately 1/4 "of space.

  2. Screw the caps on tight enough to keep a tight seal in place, but do not over-tighten them as air bubbles must be able to escape.

  3. Place the packed cans in the canning pot and cover with 1-2 inches of water. Bring to a boil and process 15 minutes. Remove from the pot with the jar and leave at room temperature without discomfort for 12-24 hours. You may hear a pop when the jars are completely sealed. After 24 hours, verify that the seal has been formed by pressing down on the center of the cap; it should not move at all. If the seal does not form, refrigerate the adjika and enjoy within 3 months.

Signs of spoiled canned food:

With any type of canning, we follow this advice: "When in doubt, throw it away" Discard and do not eat or taste any canned food if you notice any of the following:

  • the bottle is leaking, bulging or swollen
  • the bottle appears damaged, cracked or abnormal
  • the bottle gushs foam or liquid when you open it
  • canned food is discolored, moldy, mushy, slimy, or smells bad

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