How to Make a Roux (Easy Roux Recipe)

With this simple Roux recipe you will learn how to make a roux from a light blonde roux to a rich, dark chocolate brown roux to make soups, gumbo, sauces and more. Let's make some roux!

One of the biggest questions I get on the blog here is how to properly make a roux. I use a roux in many different recipes, especially Cajun and Creole gumbo, which is one of my favorite dishes in the world.

The key to a fantastic gumbo and many other dishes starts with a good quality roux. This post shows you how to make a proper roux.

What is a Roux?

A roux (pronounced "roo") is essentially a uniform mixture of oil or other fat and flour that is stirred and cooked slowly, constantly, in a saucepan until brown. It is used as a thickener and flavor builder to make sauce, casseroles, soups and sauces as well as gumbo, a very popular dish from Louisiana.

Let's talk about how to make a roux, shall we?

Roux ingredients

  • ½ cup of peanut oil or vegetable oil – You can use other fat, such as butter, lard or bacon fat
  • ½ cup flour

How to Make a Roux Recipe Method

Heat the oil in a large saucepan or pan to medium heat, then stir in the raw flour.

Stir constantly. The oil and flour are combined to form a liquid slurry. If you do not keep stirring, the roux will start to burn and you will have to start over, so do not stop stirring.

Stirring is a must!

You can smell when the roux is burning. It's crisp, uncomfortable, a bit like roasted popcorn. If this happens, toss it and start over. It will ruin the taste of whatever you are doing. So be careful and don't raise the heat too high to hurry your roux along.

What you are looking for is the color of roux. It starts the color of flour, very light, dough-ish, but when it warms it starts to brown, going from a white roux to light brown to the color of peanut butter or copper and eventually to a rich chocolate brown.

How long does it take to make a Roux?

A roux can take anywhere from 5-45 minutes depending on the amount you make, your desired color and amount of heat Personally, I take 20-30 minutes for my typical 1/2 cup of each oil and flour, giving me a roux a copper or peanut butter color. The roux, then, is large, coaxed by unique flavor. When I make a smaller batch roux, such as 2-3 tablespoons each oil and flour, it takes a lot less time.

If you continue to cook and stir longer, you get a darker chocolate color that is even richer in flavor, but a darker roux usually results in thinner sauces, gumbo's and soups for most home cooks. It does not thicken as much as a lighter gumbo, although it has a more nutty flavor. Feel free to experiment to find out which shade of roux produces the best flavors for your taste buds.

This is what my Roux looks like

Making the Roux color darkens the longer you cook and stir. Make sure to stir continuously. "Width =" 900 "Height =" 1000

This is after approx. 20 minutes. If you continue to cook the roux and stir, the roux will turn into a dark chocolate brown color.

How to make a Roux in the oven

You can also make a roux in the oven. Some New Orleans chefs prefer this method as they can make larger batches with far less effort. Although it takes longer than traditional roux, it is far more hands-on. Some may feel it is cheating to make an oven roux, but who cares if it saves you time?

To make an oven roux, Whisk together flour and oil in a cast iron pan or Dutch oven, and then bake at 350 degrees F for approx. 2-1 / 2 hours. Give it a good stir every 20 minutes.

Once your roux has reached your preferred color, remove it and use it as you would in any gumbo or similar recipe, such as a fricassee or etoufée.

If you make a larger batch, freeze your roux in containers and use it later.

Boom! Done! You now have a roux! Now you can use it in any recipe you like. Making roux is easy, isn't it? No problem.

What to do with Roux?

A good roux is often the first step in many recipes, including making gumbo, soups, stews, white sauces or dark sauces with a dark roux, cheese sauces and soups, low sauce and so much more.

Recipe tips and notes

  • Keep stirring Roux. It is extremely important to keep stirring the flour so that it does not stick to the bottom of the pan where it can burn. If you burn your roux, don't use it. It will give your gumbo, soup or sauce an unpleasant fresh taste. It is best to start over. Try using a pattern eight when stirring to get the entire bottom of the pan evenly and do not use too high heat.
  • Best oil for Roux. Neutral oils with higher smoke points are best for roux making to avoid burning your roux. Peanut oil is very popular, as is canola oil. You can make a roux with olive oil, but it is more likely to burn because of the lower smoke point.
  • Other Fats for Roux Making. You don't need oil to make a roux. Try it with clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than regular butter, or use stored bacon fat or lard. You can make roux with most fats and flour.

That's it, my friends. I hope you enjoy my lightweight Roux recipe. Tell me if you make it. I would love to hear how it turned out for you. Keep it spicy!

Try some of my these popular recipes starting with a Roux

Do you have questions? Ask loose! I'm happy to help. If you enjoy this recipe, I hope you will leave a comment for some STARS. Share it on social media too. Don't forget to tag us on #ChiliPepperMadness. I will definitely share it! Thanks! – Mike H.

How to Make a Roux (Easy Roux Recipe)

With this lightweight Roux recipe, you can learn how to make a roux from a light blonde roux to a rich, dark chocolate brown roux for soups, gumbo, sauces and more.

Prep Time5 minutes

Cook Time20 minutes

Course: Main courses

Food: American, French

Keywords: cajun, roux

Servings: 4

Calories: 296kcal

  • ½ cup of peanut oil or vegetable oil
  • ½ cup flour
  • Add ½ cup of peanut oil in a large saucepan and heat to medium heat. Add flour and stir.

  • Cook for 10 minutes with constant stirring until the roux lightly browns to a blonde roux, or continue to stir and cook for up to 30 minutes to get a roux of chocolate color. The roux darkens as you stir, from very light brown to copper or peanut butter, then to light chocolate, then dark chocolate, then very, very dark brown.

NOTE: It is extremely important to keep stirring the flour so that it does not stick to the bottom of the pan where it can burn. If you burn your roux, don't use it. It will give your gumbo, soup or sauce an unpleasant fresh taste. It is best to start over. Try using a pattern eight when stirring to get the entire bottom of the pan evenly and do not use too high heat. Makes about 1/2 cup roux.

Calories: 296kcal | Carbohydrates: 12 g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 27g | Saturated fat: 5g | Sodium: 1 mg | Potassium: 17 mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Iron: 1 mg

How to make a Roux (Easy Roux recipe) "data-pin-description =" How to make a Roux (Easy Roux recipe)

0 Compartir